Let's Talk Google Grants
Carlos Vizcardo
by Carlos Vizcardo

Why Nonprofits Should Consider An Animated Video

Why videos are important.

The goal of every nonprofit is to reach more users and raise awareness as quickly as possible. This results in nonprofits creating a website full of content in order to generate as many clicks as possible back to their website. The problem is most users will not read through your entire website and may just skim through it if you catch their eye with some images to compliment your content. So what's the fix? An explainer video for your nonprofit.

What is an explainer video?

An explainer video is a short, fun, and, most importantly, informative video that usually last between 2 to 3 minutes. An explainer video is light and easy to watch and draws viewers into learning about your nonprofit. Viewers will be able to connect with your nonprofit in a matter of minutes instead of having to take a longer time to read about what your nonprofit is trying to do. Explainer videos are the future of nonprofit marketing.

Why should you create an animated video?

When most nonprofits think about creating a video, they lean more towards a traditional video using real actors. While that is one way to do it, we recommend using an animated video, which we believe will capture the user's interest more readily. This is the reason why most for-profits turn to an animated explainer video.So what makes a good animated video for a nonprofit? Why should you make one for your nonprofit? How can you do it? We're going to answer these questions, show your nonprofit who it can turn to for an animated explainer video and at the end show 3 examples of what we believe are the best animated explainer videos out there.

An investment, not an expense.

Marketing and branding your nonprofit should never be considered an expense, but an investment. Creating a video about what your nonprofit does is essential. Keep in mind that most users will not have the time to read your entire site, so giving them the option to watch a 2-3 minute video can make a big difference for your nonprofit. The great thing is that creating a video is a one-time investment; once it's paid for, it's yours. There's no monthly fee to keep up with or to optimize it. However, you want to avoid skimping on a budget for a video. A quality video will draw in quality donations and exposure, so expect to spend around $1,000 to $5,000 for an animated explainer video.

Working with a small budget.

Now you may be asking, where do you go for a video? Do you search on Google? Do you contact local companies? The answer is none of the above. We recommend using Video Brewery. With Video Brewery, you pay a one-time fee of $10 to list your project. You choose your max budget (let's say $5,000) and how you would like your video to look. After about 48 hours, companies or freelancers will submit their proposal to create your video. Their proposals usually end up being under your max budget. Video Brewery brings companies and freelancers with their proposals to your nonprofit through this process. Best part: you can negotiate the price and compare their work, making Video Brewery an awesome option for your nonprofit video.

Why nonprofits should consider an animated video

A video is not a brochure.

A video is not a brochure or a long article. It's purpose is to identify a problem, show how your nonprofit is working to find a solution for this problem, and how people can help. This should all be done in a video no longer than 3 minutes; but if you are able to do in 2 minutes, you're golden. Everyone who visits your website will see this video. If done right, they will begin to click around your website and build a stronger relationship with your nonprofit by learning even more about it.

Following this, you'll want to ask viewers of your video and visitors to your website to donate or subscribe to your e-newsletter. Take note that most people will not donate the first time around on your website, so keeping contact with them is essential. Make sure your e-newsletter strategy is top notch and your branding is being done right. This, along with your animated explainer video will greatly help your nonprofit. 

Having no end-goal.

Creating a video is a great investment with the potential for a greater return. It will help your nonprofit rank higher on search engines and make your nonprofit seem modern. But remember, just like your other strategies have an end-goal, so should your video. Are you going to ask people to donate? Subscribe? Talk about this with your team to determine what is your ultimate goal, whether it be donations or advertising your latest nonprofit campaign, and how you're going to achieve that goal. Don't think of your video as an AB strategy or as the do-all of your website. Your video may be part A, a newsletter subscription part B, and donations part D of the strategy you choose. These all must work together for your goal, but including a video in that strategy will pay for itself when done right.  

The best nonprofit animated video.

So with all of that explained, you may be wondering what kinds of nonprofits are using a creative animated video in their campaigns. Bigger name charities, such as UNICEF, St. Jude, and Save the Children are such recognizable charities that they don't need a video to generate donations. But for smaller and lesser-known nonprofits, a video can be great way modernize themselves and show that their are forward thinking. As promised, below is our all time favorite nonprofit explainer video.

Water Changes Everything

Side note: Ever heard of Google's nonprofit program?

Did you know Google provides nonprofits with $10,000 per month in free advertising credit? This program is known as Google Grants and it's available to almost every 501c3 nonprofit organization. We've put together a free live one on one demo. All you have to do is click the button below.

Carlos Vizcardo

Carlos Vizcardo
Carlos is the Founder of Elevate Clicks and owns a few passive income websites. He started his first nonprofit at 19 years old and has been involved in the nonprofit world ever since. He currently owns two cats and one dog.

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